Friends of the Somme - Mid Ulster Branch  
ff
Date Name Information
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson FERGUSON – Missing since 16th August, Private Bertie Ferguson, Canadian Forces, eldest son of the late Bob Ferguson and of Mrs Ferguson, of 457 Ashdale Avenue, Toronto, Canada, and grandson of the late Robert Ferguson, of Killycurragh, Cookstown.
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson 02475
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 28th October 1944: Reported Missing
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson Toronto papers to hand report that Corporal R J Ferguson, who was reported missing on 10th August, is now reported officially as killed on that date. He was the eldest son of Mrs Margaret Ferguson and the late Robert Ferguson and grandson of the late Robert Ferguson, of Killycurragh. He was born in Donemana, where his late father was creamery manager, but was brought up in Killycurragh until the family emigrated to Canada. He was then only six years of age. Educated at Bruce Public School and Roden Commercial School, he was employed by the Dunlop Rubber Company prior to enlistment in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and went overseas in September 1942. After two years training in England, he spent his leave visiting his aunt, Mrs Ferguson, and two uncles, who are residing on the old homestead. Another uncle is in Killyman Creamery and a fourth lives at Dunmore. This gallant young soldier was a member of the United Church of Canada and of Cameron L.O.L. No. 303 of Toronto.
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson 02474
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 17th February 1945: Corporal R J Ferguson Reported Killed
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson The CWGC record Lance Corporal Robert James Ferguson as the son of Robert Ferguson, and of Margaret Ferguson, of Toronto, Ontario.
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson Lance Corporal Robert James Ferguson is buried in Bretteville-Sur-Laize Canadian War Cemetery near Caen in France. His inscription reads: IN LOVING MEMORY OF MY DEAR SON "BERT" HIS DUTY WELL DONE. MOTHER
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson Two of Robert’s brothers, William and Victor, also served during World War Two.
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson At the time of his death, his mother was living at 457 Ashdale Avenue, Toronto.
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson It was some months before his death was confirmed.
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson Lance Corporal Robert James Ferguson was serving with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders of Canada (Princess Louise's), R.C.I.C., when he was killed on 10th August 1944.
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson Lance Corporal Ferguson spent his final leave visiting his aunt and two uncles at Killycurragh, Cookstown.
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson After enlisting, Robert James Ferguson proceeded overseas in September 1942. He spent two years training in England.
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson Prior to enlistment, Bertie Ferguson was employed with the Dunlop Rubber Company in Canada.
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson His father died in 1937.
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson Bertie, as he came known, was a member of the United Church of Canada and of Cameron L.O.L. No 613 of Toronto.
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson Robert was educated at Bruce Public School and then at Roden Commercial School.
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson Robert was brought up in Killycurragh, outside Cookstown, by his aunts and uncles until the family emigrated to Canada in 1928 when he was six years old.
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson His father was a creamery manager.
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson Robert was born on 1st May 1922 in Donemana, near Strabane. Robert was the oldest of six children, four boys and two girls.
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson Robert James Ferguson was the son of Robert and Margaret Ferguson.
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson 02473
30/08/2020 L/Corp Robert James Ferguson 02472
22/08/2020 Flt. Sgt Herbert Lisser 02471
22/08/2020 Flt. Sgt Herbert Lisser There must be still some doubt that the Mid Ulster Mail report refers to Herbert Lister. However, the age, the dates, the shot escaping, the seriously injured and moved to Belfast, all seem to fit the narrative put together here.
22/08/2020 Flt. Sgt Herbert Lisser While attempting to escape from the prisoner of war camp near Cookstown on Monday (20th March) night, a German prisoner of war, aged 21, was fired on by the military guard and received five bullet wounds. He was attended to by two German doctors and later taken to Dungannon Hospital, where he was attended to by Dr J G Bell. Subsequently he was removed to a military hospital in Belfast, in a serious condition. It is stated that the German had got clear of the heavy barbed wire entanglements when spotted, and as he refused to halt, the sentry opened fire. He received four bullet wounds in the right arm and a fifth in the chest. The right arm was badly shattered and Dr Bell gave a blood transfusion.
22/08/2020 Flt. Sgt Herbert Lisser 02470
22/08/2020 Flt. Sgt Herbert Lisser From the Mid Ulster Mail dated Saturday 24th March 1945: Escaping Prisoner Shot
22/08/2020 Flt. Sgt Herbert Lisser Subsequently he was removed to a military hospital in Belfast in a serious condition. He received treatment at No. 24 British General Hospital, Campbell College, Belfast.
22/08/2020 Flt. Sgt Herbert Lisser He was attended to by two German doctors and later taken to Dungannon Hospital, where he was attended to by Dr J G Bell. Dr Bell gave a blood transfusion.
22/08/2020 Flt. Sgt Herbert Lisser The German had got clear of the heavy barbed wire entanglements when he was spotted. He refused to halt and the sentry opened fire. He received four bullet wounds in the right arm and a fifth in the chest. His right arm was badly shattered.
22/08/2020 Flt. Sgt Herbert Lisser Many thanks to the Wartime NI website, from which most of this information comes (see below).
22/08/2020 Flt. Sgt Herbert Lisser Obergefreiter Herbert Lisser remains were reinterred in Germany on 18th July 1962.
22/08/2020 Flt. Sgt Herbert Lisser On 26th February 1948, he was reinterred in Glenalina Section ES, Grave 207
22/08/2020 Flt. Sgt Herbert Lisser Herbert Lisser was initially buried on 24th March 1945 in Glenalina Section AS, Grave 159, Belfast City Cemetery, Belfast
22/08/2020 Flt. Sgt Herbert Lisser The funeral arrangements were carried out by Messrs. Wilton, Rosewood Buildings, Crumlin Road, Belfast.’
22/08/2020 Flt. Sgt Herbert Lisser The coffin, draped with a Swastika flag was carried by six members of the Luftwaffe. Included in the small party who walked behind the coffin were two German nursing sisters who, with a number of others, were taken prisoner in a Brussels hospital. At Belfast City Cemetery, where the interment took place, a brief service was conducted by a German chaplain.
22/08/2020 Flt. Sgt Herbert Lisser ‘The Nazi salute was given by more than 100 German soldiers and airmen who stood on the steps of a hospital at a Northern Ireland prisoner of war camp today, and watched the funeral of one of their comrades, an army corporal who was fatally wounded when attempting to escape from a camp.
22/08/2020 Flt. Sgt Herbert Lisser From the Belfast Telegraph dated Saturday 24th March 1945: (Although Lisser is not named in the article, the dates and places are consistent with his death and burial.)
22/08/2020 Flt. Sgt Herbert Lisser Obergefreiter Herbert Lisser died of cardiac arrest caused by war wounds on 22nd March 1945 in Belfast.
22/08/2020 Flt. Sgt Herbert Lisser It is believed 21 year old Herbert Lisser attempted to escape on the night of Monday 20th March 1945. He was fired on by the military guard and received five bullet wounds.
22/08/2020 Flt. Sgt Herbert Lisser It is believed he was in the Monrush Camp in Cookstown.
22/08/2020 Flt. Sgt Herbert Lisser Herbert Lisser found himself in a prisoner of war camp in Northern Ireland.
22/08/2020 Flt. Sgt Herbert Lisser Obergefreiter Herbert Lisser became a prisoner of war and was given the P.O.W. number A58170.
22/08/2020 Flt. Sgt Herbert Lisser Obergefreiter Herbert Lisser served in the Luftwaffe during World War Two. The rank of Obergefreiter in the Nazi Air Force was similar to a Flight Sergeant in the Royal Air Force.
22/08/2020 Flt. Sgt Herbert Lisser Herbert Lisser was born at 51 Richthofenstrasse, Bremen, Germany about 1924.
22/08/2020 Sig/man Richard David Millar 02469
22/08/2020 Sig/man Richard David Millar 02468
15/08/2020 Fus Leonard O'Neill 02467
15/08/2020 Pte. Robert Sands 02466
15/08/2020 Pte. Joseph Sloan Private Joseph Sloan is also commemorated on the Coatbridge Memorial.
15/08/2020 Pte. Joseph Sloan 02465
15/08/2020 Pte. William V McGaw 02464
15/08/2020 L/Corp George Rollins 02463
15/08/2020 Pte. William Longmore Montgomery 02462
15/08/2020 Pte. James McClean 02461
15/08/2020 Pte. James McClean 02460
15/08/2020 A/man Frederick Stewart 02459
15/08/2020 A/man Frederick Stewart 02458
15/08/2020 A/man Frederick Stewart 02457
15/08/2020 A/man Frederick Stewart 02456
14/08/2020 Driver Frank McGeown Mrs S McGeown, of Loy Street, Cookstown, has received notification that her son, Frank, of the Royal Army Service Corps, was injured in an accident while despatch riding in Holland, and has been taken back to a hospital in England. Previous to joining up, this young man was employed in the Cookstown Bacon Factory.
14/08/2020 Driver Frank McGeown 02455
14/08/2020 Driver Frank McGeown From the Mid Ulster Mail dated Saturday 3rd March 1945:
14/08/2020 Sgt. Thomas Nelson NELSON – Cherished memories of my dear nephew, Sergeant Tommie Nelson, Air Gunner, Royal Air Force, killed in action 20th February 1944 and buried in Parish Cemetery, Beedenbostel, Celle, Hanover, Germany. ‘Absent, yet ever near’. Always rememberd by his auntie, E Scott, Moneymore Road, Cookstown.
14/08/2020 Sgt. Thomas Nelson 02454
14/08/2020 Sgt. Thomas Nelson From the Mid Ulster Mail dated Saturday 24th February 1945:
14/08/2020 Sgt. Thomas Nelson NELSON – A tribute of love and remembrance of my dear brother Tommie, Sergeant Air Gunner, Royal Air Force, killed on active service. Interred at Hanover, Germany. Ever remembered by his loving sister and brother-in-law, Greta and John Glynn. ‘We loved too dearly to ever forget.’
14/08/2020 Sgt. Thomas Nelson 02453
14/08/2020 Sgt. Thomas Nelson From the Mid Ulster Mail dated Saturday 24th February 1945:
14/08/2020 Sgt. Thomas Nelson But tries to be brave and content.’
14/08/2020 Sgt. Thomas Nelson There is someone who thinks of you daily
14/08/2020 Sgt. Thomas Nelson And finds the time long since you went.
14/08/2020 Sgt. Thomas Nelson ‘There is someone who misses you sadly
14/08/2020 Sgt. Thomas Nelson NELSON – In loving memory of my dear son and our dear brother Tommie, Sergeant Air Gunner, Royal Air Force, killed on active service on 19-20th February 1944. Interred in Parish Cemetery, Beedenbostel, Celle, Hanover, Germany. Ever remembered by his loving father and all at 92 Waterloo Road, Larne.
14/08/2020 Sgt. Thomas Nelson 02452
14/08/2020 Sgt. Thomas Nelson From the Mid Ulster Mail dated Saturday 24th February 1945:
14/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove In this case the matter is not of so much significance as the facts of the tragedy speak eloquently for themselves. It would, however, be an impossible state of affairs in the ordinary course of business if one were to find from the newspapers that, having attended an inquest and heard the verdict, any words, particularly words of possible importance, were later added to it.
14/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove I am sure that before publishing your report, you were satisfied that this was correct. At the inquest the words ‘I believe that the driver was not to blame’ were not spoken by the coroner. His verdict was read by him slowly, so that those interested could get it down. The sentence I refer to was not spoken then or at any other time. I have no doubt that your reporter can verify this. When and under what circumstances this sentence found its way into your verdict, I am unable to say. I wrote to the coroner, Dr Cousley, on 9th February, pointing out that this sentence was not spoken and was not part of the verdict as read by him and sking to hear from him. He has not replied up to the present.
14/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove ‘I find that the deceased came by his death from shock following internal haemorrhage and other multiple injuries as the result of being crushed against a wall by a U.S. Army vehicle driven by Sergeant C O’Mally. I believe that the driver was not to blame.’
14/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove Mr E Malachy Doris, solicitor, writes on 14th February. Would you please give me space to refer to your report in your last issue of the inquest on the late John Cosgrove. The verdict quoted by you was a s follows:-
14/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove 02451
14/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove From the Mid Ulster Mail dated Saturday 17th February 1945: Letters to the Editor – The Churchtown Fatality Inquest
14/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove John Corrigan is NOT listed with the CWGC as a civilian casualty.
14/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove ohn Corrigan was buried on Monday 5th February in Cookstown Catholic Cemetery.
14/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove On Saturday 3rd February 1945, John Cosgrove was working with three other men at a wall near Lissan chapel. At about 5pm, an U.S Army truck approached and its brakes failed. The truck crushed John Cosgrove against the wall and he died within an hour of wounds received. The three other men survived.
14/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove His brother, James Cosgrove, lived at McNaney’s Court, Cookstown.
14/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove In August 1944, he had begun working with the American authorities as a labourer.
14/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove John had worked for Cookstown Urban Council for some years.
14/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove John was married with eight children, the youngest being nine months at the time of his death in 1945.
14/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove According to the census, there are no young Cosgroves listed as living in Cookstown in 1911, nor for that matter in Tyrone.
14/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove John Cosgrove was born about 1905. By the time of World War Two he was living with his family in Orritor Street, Cookstown.
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove The widow, children, brother and other relatives of the late John Cosgrove, of Orritor Street, Cookstown, wish to thank all those who sympathised with them in their recent tragic bereavement; those who attended the funeral and gave assistance, particularly the following:- Rev V Malon, P.P., Rev L O’Kane, C.C., Mrs Kinnear, Mr and Mrs McCully, Messrs Paddy Kennedy and John McGahan and other workmen; Lieutenant Liam Loughran and Lieutenant O’Brien, both of the U.S. Army; Mrs Jim Mullan and other kind neighbours.
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove The funeral took place on Monday morning to Cookstown Catholic Cemetery after solemn requiem mass celebrated by the Very Rev Canon Hurson, P.P., V.F., in the presence of a large congregation. The popularity of the deceased was demonstrated by the large attendance at the funeral, especially of his fellow workers, where he was employed by the American authorities. In the course of a panegyric, Canon Hurson referred to the untimely death of the deceased, which all deplored very much. He was a decent hard working man, who always looked after the interests of his family well. He expressed deep sympathy with the sorrowing widow and young family. Among the wreaths places on the grave was one from his fellow workers at the U.S. Army Camp and also one from Lieutenant O’Brien, representing the American authorities.
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove D.L. Walsh, on behalf of the police, associated himself with the sympathy. Mr Doris acknowledged on behalf of the next of kin.
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove Lieutenant O’Brien, on behalf of the American authorities, also expressed sorrow. John Cosgrove had been working with him since August and he did not think there was a better man working in the camp.
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove Mr Twigg, on behalf of Sergeant O’Mally, associated himself with the remarks of the coroner. He had been asked by Sergeant O’Mally to state how terribly he felt sorrow for the widow and family.
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove Continuing, the coroner said that this was a very dangerous corner and the road was also narrow, and he strongly recommended that this corner be made more safe by widening. He expressed deep sympathy with the relatives of the deceased, especially with the widow and young family. It was a terrible blow to them.
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove Before giving the verdict, the coroner said he would like to commend Nurse Kinnear for her services in the case. She was a fully trained nurse, and it was a good thing to have someone present with some knowledge. She deserved great credit in the manner which she rendered aid. He would also like to commend Constable Stewart in the way in which he dealt with the case after the accident. He endeavoured to obtain a doctor, but found the telephone was out of order. He did everything he could under the circumstances and also deserved great credit.
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove Returning his verdict the coroner said:- ‘I find that the deceased came by his death from shock following internal haemorrhage and other multiple injuries as the result of being crushed against a wall by a U.S. Army vehicle driven by Sergeant C O’Mally. I believe that the driver was not to blame.’
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove 02450
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove To Mr Twigg – I opened my eyes when the lorry stopped. I could not say what state the scaffolding was in. I had not seen the men working at the wall on the way out.
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove To Mr Doris – The driver sounded his horn coming to the corner and changed down about 150 yards from the corner. I felt that the driver would not get round the corner. I closed my eyes. I felt the bump against the wall. It was not a terrible impact.
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove Antonio Lupari, of Market Street, Magherafelt, said he was employed at United States Army Camp and accompanied O’Mally on this occasion. At the foot of a hill, past a chapel, they were approaching a left hand bend, and the driver changed down and the lorry slowed up. It was not going fast – he could not tell the speed. As the lorry approached the bend he saw the driver apply the brakes and try to pull the lorry round, but the brakes seemed not to work, and the lorry did not turn the corner. ‘I then closed my eyes’, added the witness, and found the lorry hitting a wall where men were working. He helped to carry Cosgrove into a house.
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove Lieutenant Michael O’Brien, giving evidence, said that he was in charge of the camp where Sergeant O’Mally is stationed. This truck was inspected either on Friday or Saturday morning and if any defect was discovered it would not be permitted to go out. The witness examined it after the accident and found a ruptured pipe line; the brakes on the back wheels were of no use. Sergeant O’Mally has an excellent driving record. The rupture of the pipeline could have occurred at the time of the accident, but he thought it occurred when the driver applied the brakes.
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove Sergeant Charles O’Mally, the driver of the lorry, giving evidence, said that he was driving for three years with the army, and before that he had eight years driving experience. On Saturday he was detailed to take a dodge half ton lorry to collect workmen. Coming from the camp in the evening, he had Antonio Lupari beside him, and Peter Loughran and his bicycle on the back. The witness passed the men working at the wall and took Loughran to his house and returned to pick up the men working at the wall. It was raining hard and he was doing about 20 miles per hour, and he had the truck in second gear. Approaching the corner he applied the brakes, which are hydraulic and supposed to work on all four wheels, and found they did not work. He tried to swing round the corner but struck the wall. He felt dazed. It was his first time driving on that road and the brakes seemed all right when he stopped at Loughran’s. To Mr Doris – Drivers are taught to change down before coming to a hill. He applied the brake before he came to the corner to check the speed of the truck; the brake failed to work and he was then to close to the wall to turn the corner. The police sergeant found the hydraulic pipe line to the back wheel was broken, and that rendered the foot brake on the back wheels inoperative, but operative on the front wheels. The hand brake was effective on the back wheels.
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove Evidence of how the accident occurred was given by John Cole, of Meeting Street, Magherafelt; Patrick Kennedy of Orritor Street, Cookstown; and John McGahan, of Orritor Street, Cookstown, who were working with the deceased at building the wall in question. They were putting a cover on the wall to keep it dry when they heard the lorry coming round the bend. Kennedy was nearest the lorry, and seeing they were in danger, he jumped and shouted to the other three men. He saw the lorry bash Cosgrove against the wall and it also struck Cole. Cosgrove said ‘Pick me up and give me air’, and was removed in the ambulance. McGahan was plastering the inside of the wall which shook with the compact of the lorry, and when he went to the gateway, Cosgrove fell into the gateway from the other side of the wall. The deceased was carried into a house and later removed by an ambulance. Cole, who was on the scaffold, with Cosgrove, saw that the lorry was not going to take the corner, did not know whether to remain on the platform he was on or jump off, and the next thing he knew was that he was lying on his right side under the front axle of the lorry. He crawled out and went to where Cosgrove was in a sitting position between the two gates. The scaffold consisted two 30ft trestles on which were two boards. It projected two and a half foot on the roadway.
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove 02449
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove Dr Mulligan, of Cookstown, who saw the body in the ambulance, described the injuries. Death, in his opinion, was due to cerebral and haemorrhage and shock, following numerous injuries. The injuries were consistent with being crushed between a lorry and a wall.
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove James Cosgrove, of McNaney’s Court, Cookstown, identified the body as that of his brother, aged 42, a labourer with a wife and family of eight. The witness last saw him alive at 8:15am on Saturday morning when going to his work.
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove Sergeant Francey, of Moneymore, said that at 6:10pm he heard of the accident. When he arrived at 6:45pm, the ambulance was moving off with the body. He corroborated the evidence of Constable Stewart and added that there was a fairly steep decline for a considerable distance to within 30 yards of the bend and for the last 30 yards there is a slight incline.
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove To Mr Twigg – He thought the tyre marks were made when the lorry was backing. The road was wet at the time.
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove Proceeding, the constable described the place. The road bends sharply to the left coming from Moneymore. It is 20 and a half foot wide with a water channel. There is a wll on the left hand side with a gateway at the end, which was being repaired and was partly covered by a tarpaulin. There was a fresh mark on it about two foot from the ground as if something had hit it. The road was of tarmacadam with a good surface. It was raining heavily and was no skid mark was visible, but a heavy tyre mark was visible running to where the lorry was parked. A driver coming from Lissan direction would have a clear view of the bend for almost 200 yards. It was a dangerous corner and a number of serious accidents had occurred on it. There was no scaffolding present when he examined the place.
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove Constable Stewart said that at about 5:30pm he was on duty and heard of the accident. He went to Mrs McCully’s and found the deceased, who seemed to be in great pain, and Mrs Kinnear was giving first aid. He tried to phone for a doctor, but the telephone was out of order and Mr McCully went to Cookstown in his own motor, and the ambulance arrived at 6:45pm and took the deceased away. The military lorry had the right front mudguard and bumper damaged. He asked what had happened, but the driver gave no explanation and appeared to be suffering from shock.
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove Mrs N Kinnear, in evidence said that at about 5:30 pm, she heard that an accident had occurred, and went into Mr McCully’s private house, which adjoins the shop, and asked Mr McCully to make preparations as a man had been injured. Shen went to where there is an iron gate and found the deceased in a half-sitting position. His right leg appeared to be broken and was almost at right angles to his body. He was holding his abdomen and rocking himself and groaning. She put a splint on the leg and put him on a sheet and had him carried to Mrs McCully’s kitchen. His pulse was irregular and she made him comfortable with water bottles. He was spitting blood, his eyes were swollen and restless, his face was a bluish colour and he complained of tightness of chest and want of air. He was conscious was twenty minutes after the accident. He did not take any stimulants, he pulse got weak and he died. In her opinion, he died from internal haemorrhage.
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove An inquest was held on Monday afternoon in Moneymore Courthouse by Dr William Cousley, J.P., coroner. District Inspector Walsh, of Magherafelt, conducted the examination of the witnesses; Mr R S Twigg, solicitor, represented the driver of the truck, and Mr E M Doris, solicitor, for the next of kin.
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove 02448
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove A very sad accident occurred on Saturday evening at Churchtown when John Cosgrove, who resides in Orritor Street, Cookstown, was crushed against a wall by an American military lorry. He lived for nearly an hour later, and before death was attended by Rev V Mallon, P.P. He was a man of forty years of age, and was formerly employed by Cookstown Urban Council. Married, he leaves, besides the widow, a family of eight, the youngest of whom is only nine months. The greatest sympathy is felt for Mrs Cosgrove and her children in their great bereavement.
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove 02447
13/08/2020 Civilian John Cosgrove From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 10th February 1945: Fatal Accident at Lissan – Workman Crushed by Military Lorry
10/08/2020 Blacksmith William Hugh Freeman Ever remembered by his loving aunt Lota and uncle Alex Wallace. High Cross, Tullyhogue.
10/08/2020 Blacksmith William Hugh Freeman Peace, perfect peace.’
10/08/2020 Blacksmith William Hugh Freeman ‘Manly and brave, his young life he gave.
10/08/2020 Blacksmith William Hugh Freeman FREEMAN – Cherished and abiding memories of Petty Officer William H Freeman, Royal Navy, accidentally killed at sea on 7th February 1944. Buried at No. III War Grave, Capuccini, Malta.
10/08/2020 Blacksmith William Hugh Freeman 02446
10/08/2020 Blacksmith William Hugh Freeman From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 10th February 1945:
10/08/2020 Blacksmith William Hugh Freeman Forever remembered by his loving mother, father and sister Dorothy. 98 Church Street, Cookstown.
10/08/2020 Blacksmith William Hugh Freeman Which never can be filled.’
10/08/2020 Blacksmith William Hugh Freeman A place is vacant in our home
10/08/2020 Blacksmith William Hugh Freeman A voice we loved is still
10/08/2020 Blacksmith William Hugh Freeman ‘A light has from our household gone
10/08/2020 Blacksmith William Hugh Freeman FREEMAN – In loving memory of Petty Officer William H Freeman, Royal Navy, accidentally killed at sea on 7th February 1944. Buried at No. III War Grave, Capuccini, Malta.
10/08/2020 Blacksmith William Hugh Freeman 02445
10/08/2020 Blacksmith William Hugh Freeman From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 10th February 1945: In Memorial
    January     February     March     April     May     June     July     August     September     October     November     December
    January     February     March     April     May     June     July     August     September     October     November     December
    January     February     March     April     May     June     July     August     September     October     November     December
    January     February     March     April     May     June     July     August     September     October     November     December