Friends of the Somme - Mid Ulster Branch  
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Date Information
01/05/2020 02117
27/10/2017 Lieutenant Cecil William Glenn is also commemorated on both the Roll of Honour and the Memorial Cross at St Johnís Church, Clontarf, Dublin.
27/10/2017 The 1911 Census does not list William as living with the family at house 9 in Cavanakeeran.
27/10/2017 The 1901 Census does not list William as living with the family at house 9 in Cavanakeeran, Pomeroy, County Tyrone. His father was described as a Clerk in the Holy Orders (Rector), who was born in County Donegal.
27/10/2017 Family: William Glenn, Edith Montgomery Glenn, Edith Marian Glenn (born 18th May 1888), Cecil William Glenn (born 27th September 1889), Eileen G Glenn (born 15th June 1891), Isabel L Glenn (born 16th January 1894), Dorothea E W Glenn (born 25th February 1898), Robert William Sowry Glenn (born 11th July 1901).
27/10/2017 Cecil William was born on 27th September 1889 in Pomeroy, County Tyrone. He was one of seven children.
27/10/2017 Cecil William Glenn was the eldest son of Rev. William Glenn and Edith Montgomery Glenn. William Glenn and Edith Moore were married about 1886.
27/10/2017 Lieutenant Cecil William Glenn was killed in action on the Saturday night of 27th/28th January 1917, during an attack in which the 1st Inniskillings and 1st Border Regiment attacked strong German held positions south of Le Transloy. The 1stInniskillings lost eighteen men, but the two battalions managed to capture 394 prisoners.
15/01/2017 Lieutenant Cecil William Glenn, Army Service Corps, attached Inniskilling Fusiliers, killed in action on 28th January, was the eldest son of the late Rev William Glenn, of the Rectory, Pomeroy, County Tyrone and of Mrs Glenn, 130 Clonliffe Road, Dublin. Educated at Kingís Hospital and Trinity College, a brilliant student, every prize in the Law School fell to his share, and he graduated with a Senior Moderatorship in Legal and Political Science. He was an active member of the Dublin University Contingent of the Officer Training Corps.
15/01/2017
15/01/2017 From the Belfast Newsletter dated 5th February 1917:
30/12/2015 William then went to Trinity College, Dublin, where he was a member of the Officer Training Corps (O.T.C.). He had a brilliant university career, winning every prize in the law school, and graduated with an Honours Degree in Economics and Legal and Political Science.
30/12/2015 Both battalions were highly commended by Sir Douglas Haig and Sir Henry Rawlinson, Commander of the 4th Army. Sergeant Edward Mott of the 1st Borders received a Victoria Cross for gallantry during the attack.
30/12/2015 The 1901 census lists William Glenn at Oxmantown School Lodge.
30/12/2015 Lieutenant Cecil William Glenn has no known grave and is commemorated on panel 4C-5C on Thiepval Memorial, France.
30/12/2015 "In Memory of Cecil William Glenn, Lt, Army Service Corps, who died on Sunday, 28th January 1917"
30/12/2015 On 8th November 1916, Cecil was attached to 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers for training as an infantry officer.
30/12/2015 Shortly after the outbreak of war, he was appointed 2nd Lieutenant in the Army Service Corps, being promoted lieutenant in August 1915.
30/12/2015 From the Tyrone Courier dated 8 February 1917:
30/12/2015
30/12/2015 William was educated at Kingís Hospital in Palmerstown, Dublin.
30/12/2015 Lieutenant Cecil W Glenn, Army Service Corps (attached Inniskilling Fusiliers), killed in action on 28th January, aged 27 years, was the eldest son of the late Rev W Glenn of the Rectory, Pomeroy and Mrs Glenn, 130 Cloniffe Road, Dublin. He was educated at Kingís Hospital and Trinity College, Dublin, where he was a member of the O.T.C. He had a brilliant university career, winning every prize in the law school, and graduating with a senior moderatorship in legal and political science. Shortly after the outbreak of war, he was appointed 2nd Lieutenant in the Army Service Corps, being promoted lieutenant in August 1915. On 8th November 1916, he was attached to a battalion of the Inniskilling Fusiliers for training as an infantry officer
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