Friends of the Somme - Mid Ulster Branch  
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Date Name Information
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan 01294
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly The CWGC lists Daniel Donnelly.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly The remains of the two boys were brought home to Cookstown on Monday evening and they were buried on Tuesday morning in Cookstown.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly John Creggan, aged 10, who also lived at Killymoon Street, was also critically injured. John Creggan was admitted to Tyrone County Hospital at 8:45pm and died later that night.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly Dan died on the way to Tyrone County Hospital in Omagh.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly Daniel Donnelly was just 13 years old when he was critically injured by an unexploded bomb around 6pm at Killymoon Street, Cookstown where he lived on Sunday 14th February 1943.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan 01293
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan 01292
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan 01291
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan 01290
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan The CWGC does not list John Creggan.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan The remains of the two boys were brought home to Cookstown on Monday evening and they were buried on Tuesday morning in Cookstown.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan John Creggan was admitted to Tyrone County Hospital at 8:45pm and died just after midnight.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan Daniel Donnelly, aged 13, who also lived at Killymoon Street, was also critically injured. Dan died on the way to Tyrone County Hospital in Omagh.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan John Creggan was just 10½ years old when he was critically injured by an unexploded bomb around 6pm at Killymoon Street, Cookstown where he lived on Sunday 14th February 1943.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan Owing to the war-time conditions of travelling, neither Mr Creggan nor Mr Donnelly was able to reach Cookstown in time for the funeral.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan Mr Frank Mulgrew, undertaker, Cookstown, had charge of the funeral arrangements. The mothers, who were very much distressed, have the sympathy of all sections of the community.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan Canon Hurson, P.P., officiated at the committal service by the graveside in the Roman Catholic burial ground.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan The mothers of the boys, their little sisters and brothers, and their comrades of St Mary’s Boys School attended the service. At the funeral the schoolboys formed a procession under the charge of their two masters, Messrs Kelly and Leyden. Three pals of the boys walked at each side of the hearses.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan The remains of the two boys were brought home to Cookstown on Monday evening and on Tuesday morning Solemn Requiem Mass was conducted by Rev Father S Taggart, C.C., who extended sympathy to the two bereaved families, on the very sad tragedy they had endured. Both boys, he said, were just about to leave school and were on the threshold of manhood. They were intelligent strong healthy boys, but instead of entering manhood, they had been struck down by this disaster. The Rev Father Taggart then went on to deliver a very solemn warning to all boys on interfering with bombs or anything of that nature.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan 01289
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan District Inspector Tease, and a young army Major, wearing the Victoria Cross ribbon, joined in the expression of sympathy for the relatives.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan The coroner, returning a verdict of accidental death, said it was a most unfortunate accident due to the finding of a grenade in a field used for bombing practice. He was not satisfied about how the bomb came to be there. He thought it was a duty of the military authorities not to leave these things lying about. They were told by constable Roberts that children were frequently seen in this field. It was a natural consequence that children, from curiosity, should pick up the bomb, and it should not have been left lying about. There must have been neglect somewhere. It was obvious that Private Kemp did not realise the bomb was dangerous, otherwise he would not have handled it the way he did. He (the Coroner), added a rider to the effect that military authorities should make further enquiries and find out who was responsible for leaving the bomb in the field. He would like to endorse all Mr Dickie said about the danger of picking up unusual objects. He expressed deep sympathy with the bereaved parents.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan Mr Dickie, on behalf of the War Department, pointed out that the bomb or grenade had been taken from a recognised bombing range, which was fenced with barbed wire and special warning notices against trespass were displayed, and not only warning notices but a red flag. It would be normally impossible to make the place proof against entrance, especially by children. The place could not always be under supervision. This was one of those unfortunate happenings which was due to the fact that Press and radio warnings not to touch any weapons or unusual objects had been ignored, not only by children, but by other people. It was a most unfortunate happening, and on behalf of the War Department, he tendered deep sympathy to the relatives of the children.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan Private Kemp (recalled) said he threw the bomb into the hedge.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan ‘The soldier tried to screw the end thing off it. He was going to throw it away, and Harry Hampsey said ‘I want it’, and the soldier gave it back to Hampsey.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan ‘Did you see the soldier take the bomb from him?’
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan The Coroner - ‘Are you sure?’ ‘Yes’
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan John Woods (recalled), said ‘ I think the soldier gave it back to him.’
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan 'You don’t know the soldier?’ ‘No’
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan Coroner – ‘Were you showing any other soldiers that bomb?’ ‘No’
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan Harry Hampsey (recalled by the Coroner), reiterated that the soldier handed him the bomb after examining it.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan To the Coroner – Any person could get through the wire fencing, and children did very often. The place where the bomb was found was used for bomb throwing practice.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan Constable Roberts gave evidence that the field where the bomb was found was fenced with barbed wire, and notice boards warning people of danger where displayed at several points, and a red flag was flying.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan Private Walker gave evidence of finding part of an unexploded bomb in the house when he went in with a stretcher party, and Private Geary, a member f an ambulance party which travelled to Omagh with the injured boys, gave evidence that Daniel Donnelly died in the ambulance.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan Private George Kemp gave evidence that about 6pm on Sunday, he was walking in Killymoon Street and two children overtook him. One of the children had a bomb in his hand and gave it to the witness who examined it. He did not know what type it was and assumed it was a training bomb. The witness attempted to remove the base plug, but did not succeed. The fuses at the top of the bomb were blackened and looked burned. He struck it hard(?) on the base with his fist to try and loosen the base plug. The witness thought it was a bomb which had been fired and was useless, and threw it into the hedge at the roadside, and told the children to leave it alone and not touch it. They told the witness they found it in the woods at the back of the castle. The witness had since been shown a type of grenade similar to that handed to him by the children. In reply to the Coroner, the witness said that Private O’Reilly accompanied him.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan Witness – No
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan The Coroner – 'Do you know the soldiers you were talking to?'
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan To the Coroner – 'The place where he got the bomb was wired in, in the centre of the field'
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan Harry Hampsey, aged twelve, gave evidence that he and the other boys, including the previous witness, went to Killymoon demesne and entered Farley’s field. Noel Blair, who was in front, saw a bomb in the field; it was at a hill with wire all round it. There was a red flag with a ‘W.D’ danger notice. The witness picked up the bomb and went off towards home. He overtook a soldier and asked him if it was any good, and the soldier replied that it was not, so the witness took it home. His mother told him to take it out. Daniel Donnelly, who was in the house, told the witness to throw it in the quarry hole, which is only a short distance from the witness’s home, and when the witness was going to do so, Donnelly snatched it out of his hand. The deceased went along the rear of the houses in the direction of the gable of Mr Boyle’s house. The witness thought he was going to throw the bomb into the quarry hole, and went back into the house and heard the explosion.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan John Woods, of Killymoon Street, a boy of eleven, said in evidence that on Sunday afternoon he went to Killymoon Demesne for a stick, and was accompanied by Harry Hampsey and other boys. Earlier in the day he had seen Donnelly and Creggan. In the morning, the witness saw Harry Hampsey pick up a bomb in the demesne; he said ‘Look what I found!” They came over and looked at the bomb. Harry Hampsey ran off towards Cookstown, taking the bomb with him. The witness saw Hampsey talking to two soldiers; he was showing the bomb to them. Hampsey then ran home and the witness did not see him again. The bomb was picked up in Mr Sam Farley’s field, used by the soldiers.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan Edward Boyle of Killymoon Street, Cookstown, stated that at 6.25pm he was going around the gable of his house, when he met the boy, Daniel Donnelly, running towards him from the rear of the houses. About three seconds after he passed, the witness heard an explosion. The witness went to the front of the house again and saw Donnelly and Creggan lying on the street, about five feet apart. He lifted Creggan in his arms and saw he was injured. He passed him over to Patrick Smith, a neighbour, and went to Donnelly, and saw he was badly injured. Soldiers arrived very shortly and attended to the injured children. There was a hole in the street about a foot deep, and the windows in the witness’ and adjoining houses were blown out. The witness identified the bodies. Creggan’s father is a serving soldier and Donnelly’s father is working in England.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan The other boy, Daniel Donnelly, was dead on arrival at the hospital. Examination of the boy showed that there was a punctured wound on the frontal bone of the skull, exposing the brain. He had a fractured right arm and left leg, and he had multiple superficial wounds. Death was due to shock and multiple injuries.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan An inquest was held by Mr A F Colhoun, Coroner, at the County Hospital, Omagh, on Tuesday. Mr J F Dickie appeared for the Crown. Dr William Cullen, house surgeon, gave evidence that John Creggan was admitted to Tyrone County Hospital at 8:45 pm on 14th February, and died just after midnight. He had perforated wounds in the abdomen and stomach, and a chest wound on the left side, and a fractured left leg. His right eye was also punctured and he had also superficial injuries. Death was due to shock and multiple injuries.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan 01288
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan The boys’ mothers were distraught when they heard what had happened. Added to their misery was the absence of both their husbands. Mr Creggan, who isa private in the army, is stationed in England, and Mr Donnelly is also in England, having gone to work there only quite recently.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan Constable Roberts and Rev Captain McCullough, C.F., besides the military medical men, accompanied the ambulance on its long trek of twenty five miles across the moor to Omagh. The two casualties had to be taken there owing to the fact that there is no hospital of any sort in Cookstown. Unfortunately young Donnelly passed away on the journey at Mountfield, only about four miles from Omagh. The ambulance continued on its way in the faint hope that they might save the life of the other boy. However, Creggan also died several hours after his admission to the hospital.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan Head Constable Close was the first member of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (R.U.C.) to reach the place, and soon District Inspector Tease, with Sergeant Greer and Constable Roberts arrived to take charge of the situation. Dr M R Neilly (whom is acting for Dr Elliot, at present indisposed) was also there, but the military had already done all that could be done for the lads.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan A tragic accident occurred in Cookstown on Sunday evening about 6.30 pm, when two young boys, John Creggan, aged 11, and Daniel Donnelly, aged 13, both of Killymoon Street, lost their lives in the explosion of an anti-tank grenade in Killymoon Street, not very far from young Donnelly’s own home. The sound of the explosion was heard over a considerable part of the town and drew many people to the scene of the accident. Nearby houses were damaged, many windows being blown out by the force of the explosion. Military and police rushed quickly to the spot and worked with all possible haste in an attempt to save the lives of the boys. Lieutenant Rennie, an army medical officer, assisted by other army medical men, dressed the wounds of the boys, who were sent to the County Hospital on the arrival of a military ambulance.
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan 01287
31/10/2017 Master John Creggan From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 20th February 1943: Cookstown Double Tragedy – Two boys killed by bomb
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly Owing to the war-time conditions of travelling, neither Mr Creggan nor Mr Donnelly was able to reach Cookstown in time for the funeral.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly Mr Frank Mulgrew, undertaker, Cookstown, had charge of the funeral arrangements. The mothers, who were very much distressed, have the sympathy of all sections of the community.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly Canon Hurson, P.P., officiated at the committal service by the graveside in the Roman Catholic burial ground.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly The mothers of the boys, their little sisters and brothers, and their comrades of St Mary’s Boys School attended the service. At the funeral the schoolboys formed a procession under the charge of their two masters, Messrs Kelly and Leyden. Three pals of the boys walked at each side of the hearses.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly The remains of the two boys were brought home to Cookstown on Monday evening and on Tuesday morning Solemn Requiem Mass was conducted by Rev Father S Taggart, C.C., who extended sympathy to the two bereaved families, on the very sad tragedy they had endured. Both boys, he said, were just about to leave school and were on the threshold of manhood. They were intelligent strong healthy boys, but instead of entering manhood, they had been struck down by this disaster. The Rev Father Taggart then went on to deliver a very solemn warning to all boys on interfering with bombs or anything of that nature.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly 01289
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly District Inspector Tease, and a young army Major, wearing the Victoria Cross ribbon, joined in the expression of sympathy for the relatives.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly The coroner, returning a verdict of accidental death, said it was a most unfortunate accident due to the finding of a grenade in a field used for bombing practice. He was not satisfied about how the bomb came to be there. He thought it was a duty of the military authorities not to leave these things lying about. They were told by constable Roberts that children were frequently seen in this field. It was a natural consequence that children, from curiosity, should pick up the bomb, and it should not have been left lying about. There must have been neglect somewhere. It was obvious that Private Kemp did not realise the bomb was dangerous, otherwise he would not have handled it the way he did. He (the Coroner), added a rider to the effect that military authorities should make further enquiries and find out who was responsible for leaving the bomb in the field. He would like to endorse all Mr Dickie said about the danger of picking up unusual objects. He expressed deep sympathy with the bereaved parents.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly Mr Dickie, on behalf of the War Department, pointed out that the bomb or grenade had been taken from a recognised bombing range, which was fenced with barbed wire and special warning notices against trespass were displayed, and not only warning notices but a red flag. It would be normally impossible to make the place proof against entrance, especially by children. The place could not always be under supervision. This was one of those unfortunate happenings which was due to the fact that Press and radio warnings not to touch any weapons or unusual objects had been ignored, not only by children, but by other people. It was a most unfortunate happening, and on behalf of the War Department, he tendered deep sympathy to the relatives of the children.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly Private Kemp (recalled) said he threw the bomb into the hedge.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly ‘The soldier tried to screw the end thing off it. He was going to throw it away, and Harry Hampsey said ‘I want it’, and the soldier gave it back to Hampsey.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly ‘Did you see the soldier take the bomb from him?’
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly The Coroner - ‘Are you sure?’ ‘Yes’
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly John Woods (recalled), said ‘ I think the soldier gave it back to him.’
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly 'You don’t know the soldier?’ ‘No’
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly Coroner – ‘Were you showing any other soldiers that bomb?’ ‘No’
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly Harry Hampsey (recalled by the Coroner), reiterated that the soldier handed him the bomb after examining it.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly To the Coroner – Any person could get through the wire fencing, and children did very often. The place where the bomb was found was used for bomb throwing practice.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly Constable Roberts gave evidence that the field where the bomb was found was fenced with barbed wire, and notice boards warning people of danger where displayed at several points, and a red flag was flying.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly Private Walker gave evidence of finding part of an unexploded bomb in the house when he went in with a stretcher party, and Private Geary, a member f an ambulance party which travelled to Omagh with the injured boys, gave evidence that Daniel Donnelly died in the ambulance.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly Private George Kemp gave evidence that about 6pm on Sunday, he was walking in Killymoon Street and two children overtook him. One of the children had a bomb in his hand and gave it to the witness who examined it. He did not know what type it was and assumed it was a training bomb. The witness attempted to remove the base plug, but did not succeed. The fuses at the top of the bomb were blackened and looked burned. He struck it hard(?) on the base with his fist to try and loosen the base plug. The witness thought it was a bomb which had been fired and was useless, and threw it into the hedge at the roadside, and told the children to leave it alone and not touch it. They told the witness they found it in the woods at the back of the castle. The witness had since been shown a type of grenade similar to that handed to him by the children. In reply to the Coroner, the witness said that Private O’Reilly accompanied him.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly Witness – No
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly The Coroner – 'Do you know the soldiers you were talking to?'
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly To the Coroner – 'The place where he got the bomb was wired in, in the centre of the field'
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly Harry Hampsey, aged twelve, gave evidence that he and the other boys, including the previous witness, went to Killymoon demesne and entered Farley’s field. Noel Blair, who was in front, saw a bomb in the field; it was at a hill with wire all round it. There was a red flag with a ‘W.D’ danger notice. The witness picked up the bomb and went off towards home. He overtook a soldier and asked him if it was any good, and the soldier replied that it was not, so the witness took it home. His mother told him to take it out. Daniel Donnelly, who was in the house, told the witness to throw it in the quarry hole, which is only a short distance from the witness’s home, and when the witness was going to do so, Donnelly snatched it out of his hand. The deceased went along the rear of the houses in the direction of the gable of Mr Boyle’s house. The witness thought he was going to throw the bomb into the quarry hole, and went back into the house and heard the explosion.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly John Woods, of Killymoon Street, a boy of eleven, said in evidence that on Sunday afternoon he went to Killymoon Demesne for a stick, and was accompanied by Harry Hampsey and other boys. Earlier in the day he had seen Donnelly and Creggan. In the morning, the witness saw Harry Hampsey pick up a bomb in the demesne; he said ‘Look what I found!” They came over and looked at the bomb. Harry Hampsey ran off towards Cookstown, taking the bomb with him. The witness saw Hampsey talking to two soldiers; he was showing the bomb to them. Hampsey then ran home and the witness did not see him again. The bomb was picked up in Mr Sam Farley’s field, used by the soldiers.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly Edward Boyle of Killymoon Street, Cookstown, stated that at 6.25pm he was going around the gable of his house, when he met the boy, Daniel Donnelly, running towards him from the rear of the houses. About three seconds after he passed, the witness heard an explosion. The witness went to the front of the house again and saw Donnelly and Creggan lying on the street, about five feet apart. He lifted Creggan in his arms and saw he was injured. He passed him over to Patrick Smith, a neighbour, and went to Donnelly, and saw he was badly injured. Soldiers arrived very shortly and attended to the injured children. There was a hole in the street about a foot deep, and the windows in the witness’ and adjoining houses were blown out. The witness identified the bodies. Creggan’s father is a serving soldier and Donnelly’s father is working in England.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly The other boy, Daniel Donnelly, was dead on arrival at the hospital. Examination of the boy showed that there was a punctured wound on the frontal bone of the skull, exposing the brain. He had a fractured right arm and left leg, and he had multiple superficial wounds. Death was due to shock and multiple injuries.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly An inquest was held by Mr A F Colhoun, Coroner, at the County Hospital, Omagh, on Tuesday. Mr J F Dickie appeared for the Crown. Dr William Cullen, house surgeon, gave evidence that John Creggan was admitted to Tyrone County Hospital at 8:45 pm on 14th February, and died just after midnight. He had perforated wounds in the abdomen and stomach, and a chest wound on the left side, and a fractured left leg. His right eye was also punctured and he had also superficial injuries. Death was due to shock and multiple injuries.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly 01288
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly The boys’ mothers were distraught when they heard what had happened. Added to their misery was the absence of both their husbands. Mr Creggan, who isa private in the army, is stationed in England, and Mr Donnelly is also in England, having gone to work there only quite recently.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly Constable Roberts and Rev Captain McCullough, C.F., besides the military medical men, accompanied the ambulance on its long trek of twenty five miles across the moor to Omagh. The two casualties had to be taken there owing to the fact that there is no hospital of any sort in Cookstown. Unfortunately young Donnelly passed away on the journey at Mountfield, only about four miles from Omagh. The ambulance continued on its way in the faint hope that they might save the life of the other boy. However, Creggan also died several hours after his admission to the hospital.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly Head Constable Close was the first member of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (R.U.C.) to reach the place, and soon District Inspector Tease, with Sergeant Greer and Constable Roberts arrived to take charge of the situation. Dr M R Neilly (whom is acting for Dr Elliot, at present indisposed) was also there, but the military had already done all that could be done for the lads.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly A tragic accident occurred in Cookstown on Sunday evening about 6.30 pm, when two young boys, John Creggan, aged 11, and Daniel Donnelly, aged 13, both of Killymoon Street, lost their lives in the explosion of an anti-tank grenade in Killymoon Street, not very far from young Donnelly’s own home. The sound of the explosion was heard over a considerable part of the town and drew many people to the scene of the accident. Nearby houses were damaged, many windows being blown out by the force of the explosion. Military and police rushed quickly to the spot and worked with all possible haste in an attempt to save the lives of the boys. Lieutenant Rennie, an army medical officer, assisted by other army medical men, dressed the wounds of the boys, who were sent to the County Hospital on the arrival of a military ambulance.
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly 01287
31/10/2017 Master Daniel Donnelly From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 20th February 1943: Cookstown Double Tragedy – Two boys killed by bomb
29/10/2017 Capt Edward George Francis Gunning 01286
29/10/2017 Capt Edward George Francis Gunning The CWGC record Captain Edward George Francis Gunning as the son of Kate Francis Gunning, of 11B, Cromwell Place, South Kensington, London. He is also recorded as the son of the late Francis Porter Gunning, J.P., of Cookstown, County. Tyrone. He was previously a Lieutenant in the Irish Guards.
29/10/2017 Capt Edward George Francis Gunning In April 1915, No 6 Base Supply Depot was started at Calais to help relieve the pressure on Boulogne and to provide a base nearer to the front than Le Harve or Rouen. The base remained open until the last of the Commonwealth Forces left France in March 1921. The 30th, 35th, and 38th General Hospitals, No 9 British Red Cross Hospital and No 10 Canadian Stationary Hospital were based in the town, providing about 2,500 beds. For three years, Commonwealth burials were made in Calais Southern Cemetery, but it became necessary to start a new site at Le Baraques and the first burials took place here in September 1917. It was in continued use until 1921 and now contains 1,303 Commonwealth burials from the First World War, together with 250 other nationals, most of them German.
29/10/2017 Capt Edward George Francis Gunning Captain Edward Gunning is buried in Les Baraques Cemetery, Sangatte, Calais, France.
29/10/2017 Capt Edward George Francis Gunning Captain Edward Gunning is thought to have died as the result of an accident.
29/10/2017 Capt Edward George Francis Gunning Temporary Captain Edward George Francis Gunning was serving with the Royal Field Artillery, attached to the Royal Army Ordnance Corps (R.A.O.P), when died on 10th June 1919, aged 29.
29/10/2017 Capt Edward George Francis Gunning The Gazette, dated 24th September 1914, reports that Edward George Francis Gunning was Second Lieutenants with the Royal Regiment Op Artillery.
29/10/2017 Capt Edward George Francis Gunning The Gazette, dated 2nd September 1910, reports that the undermentioned Gentlemen Cadets from The Royal Military College to be Second Lieutenants. Edward George Francis Gunning, Irish Guards, promoted.
29/10/2017 Capt Edward George Francis Gunning The Gazette, dated 25th June 1909, reports that Edward George Francis Gunning was promoted to Second Lieutenant on 25th February 1909.
29/10/2017 Capt Edward George Francis Gunning The 1901 census does not list Edward as living with the family at 3 in Nottinghill Street, Belfast. His father was a linen merchant.
29/10/2017 Capt Edward George Francis Gunning Edward was born about 1890.
29/10/2017 Capt Edward George Francis Gunning Edward George Francis Gunning was the son of Francis Porter Gunning, J.P., and Kate Francis Gunning.
28/10/2017 Pte. Andrew McClintock Graham 01285
28/10/2017 Pte. Andrew McClintock Graham 01284
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28/10/2017 Pte. Andrew McClintock Graham Private Andrew McClintock Graham does not appear in the Commonwealth War Graves list, even though his death is certainly related to wounds received in action.
28/10/2017 Pte. Andrew McClintock Graham Private Andrew Graham is commemorated on Claggan Presbyterian Church Memorial, Cookstown and on Cookstown Cenotaph.
28/10/2017 Pte. Andrew McClintock Graham In later years his grave fell into disrepair and it was only in recent years that members of the Salvation Army took it upon themselves to restore it.
28/10/2017 Pte. Andrew McClintock Graham Private Andrew Graham was buried at Rockwood Cemetery, Sydney, Australia.
28/10/2017 Pte. Andrew McClintock Graham Private Andrew McClintock Graham died at Sydney Hospital on 7th April 1918 from a heart condition. He was 43 years old.
28/10/2017 Pte. Andrew McClintock Graham Andrew Graham enlisted with 1st Australian Imperial Forces at Casula, Liverpool, New South Wales, on 13th December 1915 when he was forty years of age.
28/10/2017 Pte. Andrew McClintock Graham Andrew Graham had been a regular soldier serving with the Cape Mounted Rifles (Colonial Forces) before enlisting.
28/10/2017 Pte. Andrew McClintock Graham 01280
28/10/2017 Pte. Andrew McClintock Graham 01282
28/10/2017 Pte. Andrew McClintock Graham 01281
28/10/2017 Pte. Andrew McClintock Graham The 1911 census does not list Andrew as living with the family at house 4 in Clagan Upper.
28/10/2017 Pte. Andrew McClintock Graham Andrew immigrated to Australia around 1909-10.
28/10/2017 Pte. Andrew McClintock Graham The 1901 census does not list Andrew as living with the family at house 13 in Clagan, Lisson Upper, County Londonderry. Both parents were retired National School Teachers.
28/10/2017 Pte. Andrew McClintock Graham Known family: Robert Graham, Barbara M Graham, William J C Graham 29 (born about 1872, Donegal), Andrew McClintock Graham (born 7th September 1875, Donegal), Wallace Graham (born 28th August 1877, Moneymore), Catherine Graham 16 (born 25th January 1880, Moneymore), Joseph Graham (born 12th December 1881, Moneymore), Robert Graham (born 13th April 1883, Moneymore), Catherine J Graham 16 (born 27th June 1884, Moneymore), Henry ‘Harry’ C Graham 15 (born 11th January 1886, Moneymore).
28/10/2017 Pte. Andrew McClintock Graham By 1877, the family has moved to live at Claggan, Cookstown, where Robert Graham was a school teacher.
28/10/2017 Pte. Andrew McClintock Graham Andrew was born 7th September 1875 at Meenlougher, Castlefin, County Donegal. He was one of ten children, seven surviving.
28/10/2017 Pte. Andrew McClintock Graham Andrew McClintock Graham was the son of Robert Graham and Barbara Mary Graham (nee McClintock). They were married about 1869.
28/10/2017 Pte. Andrew McClintock Graham He arrived in Australia on 18th September 1917 and was finally discharged from the army on 18th March 1918.
27/10/2017 Pte. James Gormley One of James’ comrades returned from Gallipoli and told his family that James had volunteered to bring back some fresh water from a well, where it is thought he was killed by a Turkish sniper.
27/10/2017 Pte. James Gormley Private James Gormley was serving with the 5th Battalion of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers when he was killed in action during the assault on Kidney Hill at Suvla, on Sunday 15th August 1915.
27/10/2017 Pte. James Gormley The battalion was sent to Gallipoli as part of 29th Division in April 1915.
27/10/2017 Pte. James Gormley James served initially with the 1st Battalion of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.
27/10/2017 Pte. James Gormley James Gormley enlisted in Cookstown.
27/10/2017 Pte. James Gormley The 1911 census does not list James as living with the family at house 43 in Church Street, Cookstown. His father was now a quarryman.
27/10/2017 Pte. James Gormley Family: William Gormley, Isabella / Annabella Gormley?, James Gormley (born about 1885, Scotland), John Gormley (born about 1887, Scotland), Margaret Gormley (born 3rd September 1888, Strabane), Bridget Gormley (born about 1892, Tyrone), Catherine Gormley (born about 1894, Scotland), William Gormley (born about 1896, Scotland), Mary Gormley (born 3rd September 1898, Dunnamanagh), Edward Gormley (born 29th September 1900, Dunnamanagh), Annabella Gormley (born 6th July 1902, Dunnamanagh), Elizabeth Gormley (born 7th July 1904, Dunnamanagh).
27/10/2017 Pte. James Gormley The 1901 census lists James as age 16, living with the family at house 1 in Cullion, Mountcastle, Tyrone. Cullion lies half way between Strabane and Newbuildings. James had left school and was a farm labourer, like his father.
27/10/2017 Pte. James Gormley In 1897, the family moved back to Dunnamanagh, north of Strabane.
27/10/2017 Pte. James Gormley In 1893 the family moved to Scotland again.
27/10/2017 Pte. James Gormley The family moved back to Strabane in 1888.
27/10/2017 Pte. James Gormley James Breslin was born about 1885 in Shettleston, Lanarkshire, Scotland. He was the eldest of ten children.
27/10/2017 Pte. James Gormley James Gormley was the eldest son of William and Annabella Gormley. William Gormley and Annabella Breslin were married about 1884.
27/10/2017 Pte. James Gormley Last Will and Testament of Private James Gormley dated 7th August 1915:
27/10/2017 Pte. William John R Gorman Private Gorman is also listed on the family memorial in Bangor Cemetery in County Down.
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27/10/2017 Pte. William John R Gorman Private W J R Gorman is also listed on the family memorial in St Matthew's Churchyard, Broomhedge, 30 Lurganure Road, Lisburn, County Antrim.
27/10/2017 Lieut Cecil William Glenn Lieutenant Cecil William Glenn is also commemorated on both the Roll of Honour and the Memorial Cross at St John’s Church, Clontarf, Dublin.
27/10/2017 Lieut Cecil William Glenn The 1911 Census does not list William as living with the family at house 9 in Cavanakeeran.
27/10/2017 Lieut Cecil William Glenn The 1901 Census does not list William as living with the family at house 9 in Cavanakeeran, Pomeroy, County Tyrone. His father was described as a Clerk in the Holy Orders (Rector), who was born in County Donegal.
27/10/2017 Lieut Cecil William Glenn Family: William Glenn, Edith Montgomery Glenn, Edith Marian Glenn (born 18th May 1888), Cecil William Glenn (born 27th September 1889), Eileen G Glenn (born 15th June 1891), Isabel L Glenn (born 16th January 1894), Dorothea E W Glenn (born 25th February 1898), Robert William Sowry Glenn (born 11th July 1901).
27/10/2017 Lieut Cecil William Glenn Cecil William was born on 27th September 1889 in Pomeroy, County Tyrone. He was one of seven children.
27/10/2017 Lieut Cecil William Glenn Cecil William Glenn was the eldest son of Rev. William Glenn and Edith Montgomery Glenn. William Glenn and Edith Moore were married about 1886.
27/10/2017 Corp Henry McDonald Glasgow The CWGC record Corporal Henry McDonald Glasgow as the son of William James and Rebecca J Glasgow of 52, James Street, Cookstown.
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27/10/2017 Corp Henry McDonald Glasgow Henry McDonald Glasgow was the youngest son of William James and Rebecca J Glasgow. William Glasgow and Rebecca Moore were married on 6th April 1891 in the district of Cookstown.
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27/10/2017 Corp Henry McDonald Glasgow Corporal Henry M Glasgow, Royal Engineers, son of Mr W J Glasgow, Cookstown, died from illness contracted on active service in France.
27/10/2017 Corp David Glendinning The CWGC record Corporal David Glendinning as the son of David and Mary Glendinning and also as the husband of Ellen Glendinning of They Cottage, Ballyronan, Magherafelt, Co. Londonderry.
27/10/2017 Corp Henry McDonald Glasgow Family: William James Glasgow, Rebecca J Glasgow, Allan Pattison Elanor Glasgow (born 21st March 1892), Ernest Moore Glasgow (born 6th July 1893), Henry MacDonald Glasgow (born 20th February 1897).
27/10/2017 Lieut Cecil William Glenn Lieutenant Cecil William Glenn was killed in action on the Saturday night of 27th/28th January 1917, during an attack in which the 1st Inniskillings and 1st Border Regiment attacked strong German held positions south of Le Transloy. The 1stInniskillings lost eighteen men, but the two battalions managed to capture 394 prisoners.
27/10/2017 Corp Henry McDonald Glasgow Henry was born on 20th February 1897 in Cookstown. He was one of four children, three surviving.
26/10/2017 L/Corp Bryce M Gilmour Lance Corporal Bryce Gilmour is also commemorated on Cookstown Cenotaph and on Second Cookstown Presbyterian Roll of Honour.
26/10/2017 L/Corp Bryce M Gilmour Lance Corporal Bryce Gilmour has no known grave and is commemorated on the Loos Memorial in Dud Corner Cemetery, France.
26/10/2017 L/Corp Bryce M Gilmour Bryce’s younger brother, Cecil Richard Gilmour, served with the Canadians (Service No 57833) during the war. Cecil survived the war. Cecil’s Canadian Military details can be downloaded.
26/10/2017 L/Corp Bryce M Gilmour On Sunday 24th October 1915, at 2nd Presbyterian Church, Cookstown, Reverend D. Maybin, B.A. spoke highly of Bryce Gilmour who was an esteemed member of the congregation.
26/10/2017 L/Corp Bryce M Gilmour It was reported that Bryce Gilmour died as a result of a bayonet wound while attacking the enemy positions at Loos.
26/10/2017 L/Corp Bryce M Gilmour Lance Corporal Bryce Gilmour was serving with the 2nd Battalion of the Irish Guards when he was killed in action on Thursday 30th September 1915.
26/10/2017 L/Corp Bryce M Gilmour Later that day their objective was to take Chalk Pit Wood in the same sector of the front, but a heavy bombardment over the following hours and days made the task almost impossible. The battalion had been under considerable strain.
26/10/2017 L/Corp Bryce M Gilmour On the 26th September 1915, the 2nd Battalion was instructed to advance to and take possession of a captured German trench at La Rutoire, Loos.
26/10/2017 L/Corp Bryce M Gilmour Bryce Gilmour left with his battalion from Brentwood Station for France on 16th August 1915.
26/10/2017 L/Corp Bryce M Gilmour In February 1915, Bryce enlisted with the Irish Guards in Dublin and trained at the old Warley Barracks. They did their first route march on the 6th August.
26/10/2017 L/Corp Bryce M Gilmour Bryce Gilmour served as a police constable with the Royal Irish Constabulary in Cookstown.
26/10/2017 L/Corp Bryce M Gilmour The family then moved to Ballymoney and his father took charge of the Ballymoney Workhouse. They lived in Charlotte Street in the town.
26/10/2017 L/Corp Bryce M Gilmour The 1911 census lists Bryce M. as age 17, living with his uncle and aunt at house 9 in Killymaddy, The Vow, County Antrim. The vow lies south of Ballymoney.
26/10/2017 L/Corp Bryce M Gilmour The 1911 census does not list Bryce as living with the family at house 21 in College Street, Ballyshannon, County Donegal. His father was Head Constable.
26/10/2017 L/Corp Bryce M Gilmour Known family: Bryce Gilmour, Ida Gilmour, William Gilmour (born about 1888), Robert W Gilmour (born about 1893), Bryce Matthew Gilmour (born about 1894), Cecil Richard Gilmour (born about 1897), Eileen Christella Gilmour (born about 1900), Vera May Gilmour (born about 1901), Ida Elizabeth Gilmour (born about 1909).
26/10/2017 L/Corp Bryce M Gilmour The 1901 census lists Bryce M as age 7, living with the family at house 62 in Connaught St. Athlone Urban, County Westmeath. His father was a sergeant in the Royal Irish Constabulary (R.I.C).
26/10/2017 L/Corp Bryce M Gilmour Bryce Gilmour was the third son of Bryce and Ida Gilmour. Brice Matthew Gilmour was born in Roscommon about 1894. He was one of ten children, seven surviving.
25/10/2017 R/man Robert Fulton The 1911 census lists a 16 year old Robert Fulton in Lederg, Bernagh, not far from Newmills. He was working as a servant for the Annesley family.
25/10/2017 R/man Robert Fulton By the time of the 1011 census the family had moved to Tullagh Beg, Stewartstown. Robert no longer lived with the family. His father was a farm labourer.
25/10/2017 R/man Robert Fulton Family: Robert Fulton, Mary Ann Fulton, Mary Fulton (born 16th March 1894, died 21st April 1899, age 5), Robert Fulton (born 20th May 1895), Jane Dougle Fulton (born 14th September 1896), William Fulton (born about 1898), John Fulton (born 20th July 1900), Albert Fulton (born 28th June 1902).
25/10/2017 R/man Robert Fulton The 1901 census records Robert as age 5, living with the family at house 16 in Roughan, near Newmills in County Tyrone. His father was a domestic servant and coachman.
25/10/2017 R/man Robert Fulton Robert was born in Newmills on 20th May 1895. He was one of six children, five surviving. His elder sister Mary died when she was just five years old.
25/10/2017 R/man Robert Fulton Robert Fulton was the eldest son of Robert and Mary Ann Fulton. Robert Fulton and Mary McKeown were married on 29th December 1892 in the district of Cookstown.
25/10/2017 Stoker 1st John Forrest Newspaper reports note he was highly regarded by all who knew him and by all reports he had a kind good-natured disposition.
25/10/2017 Stoker 1st John Forrest John returned to Britain in January 1915 and was employed in the production of torpedoes in Scotland.
25/10/2017 Stoker 1st John Forrest The 1911 census lists John as age 18, living with the family at house 1 in Highcross, Tullaghoge. John’s father was a widower and a farmer. John was a farm labourer.
25/10/2017 Stoker 1st John Forrest John’s mother, Rachael Forrest, died on 7th April 1909 in the Cookstown area, aged 53.
25/10/2017 Stoker 1st John Forrest The 1901 census records that the family lived in Highcross, Tullyhogue. They were a farming family. John was nine years old.
25/10/2017 Stoker 1st John Forrest Family: John Forrest, Rachel Forrest, Ellen J Forrest (born 29th October 1882), Margaret Forrest (born 25th July 1885), Joseph Forrest (born 31st August 1887), John Forrest (born 24th April 1892), Rachel Forrest (born about 1894), Agnes Forrest (born 13th July 1896), Richard Wilson Forrest (born 20th September 1898).
25/10/2017 Stoker 1st John Forrest John was born on 24th April 1892 in the Cookstown area. He was one of seven children.
25/10/2017 Stoker 1st John Forrest John Forrest was the son of John and Rachel Forrest. John Forrest and Rachael Wilson were married on 7th August 1881 in the district of Cookstown.
23/10/2017 Lieut George Richard Colin Campbell Among the Tyrone victims who perished with the Leinster were Lady Alexander Phyllis Hamilton, only sister of the Duke of Abercorn, and Lieutenant Commander Colin Campbell, Royal Navy, and his wife and only child. Commander Campbell was a son of Rev E F Campbell, M.A., Rector of Killyman, and a member of a family which has rendered distinguished service in the war. His wife, Mrs Eileen Hester Louisa Campbell, was the youngest daughter of Colonel Knox-Brown, D.L., Augentaine Castle, Fivemiletown and a sister of Captain T A H Knox-Brown, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who is at present recruiting officer in Dungannon.
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23/10/2017 Lieut George Richard Colin Campbell From the Tyrone Courier dated 10th October 1918:
22/10/2017 Lieut George Richard Colin Campbell Lieutenant Colonel G A Campbell, A.S.C., Killyman Rectory, Moy, has been specially mentioned in despatches by sir E H H Allenby, G.C.M.G., K.C.B., General Officer commanding-in-chief Egyptian Expeditionary Force.
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22/10/2017 Lieut George Richard Colin Campbell From the Tyrone Courier dated 20th June 1918: Gallantry (Mentioned in Despatches)
15/10/2017 Pte. William James McMinn William was a member of Coalisland L.O.L. No 93.
15/10/2017 Pte. William James McMinn At the monthly meeting of Coalisland L.O.L. No 93 held on Friday evening, Brother Thomas Neill, Worshipful Master presiding and Brother Thomas Holmes; Deputy Master in the vice-chair, the W.M. referred in feeling terms to the loss of more of their members who had fallen in action, namely 2nd Lieut. Joseph Marsh, Royal Irish Rifles, and Private William McMinn, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who had both been killed on the same day. Seven members of that Lodge had now fallen in this cruel war, fighting for King and Country. Brothers Robert J Cardwell and Robert A Montgomery had also been wounded, each for the fourth time so that their lodge’s record would be a glorious one. He proposed that the utmost sympathy on the members be conveyed to the parents of both Marsh and McMinn and the Secretary was directed to forward suitable letters of condolence. The lodge was then closed in the usual manner.
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15/10/2017 Pte. William James McMinn From the Tyrone Courier and News dated Thursday 13 December 1917: Coalisland Fallen Soldiers
15/10/2017 Lieut Eric Wallace Harris Only a few weeks before his death he was offered his captaincy, but Lieutenant Harris preferred to remain with his old battery.
15/10/2017 Lieut Eric Wallace Harris In April 1917 Lieutenant Eric Wallace Harris was recommended for distinction for special and conspicuous bravery on three occasions.
15/10/2017 Lieut Eric Wallace Harris Lieutenant Harris served at the Somme, as Arras (where he was slightly wounded in the arm) and in Flanders.
15/10/2017 Lieut Eric Wallace Harris Lieutenant Eric Wallace Harris left for France on Christmas Day 1916.
15/10/2017 Lieut Eric Wallace Harris Eric Harris was transferred to Fort Campden, County Cork to which station he was afterwards appointed as O.C.
15/10/2017 Lieut Eric Wallace Harris Eric gained the rank of Lieutenant in December 1915 and was posted to Queenstown (Spike Island) for training.
15/10/2017 Lieut Eric Wallace Harris Lieutenant Eric Wallace Harris, Royal Garrison Artillery, died of wounds on 4th November, was the only son of Mr W Wallace Harris, solicitor, 4 Dame Street, Dublin, and Mrs Harris of Chelmsford, Avoca Avenue, Blackrock and entered Trinity College, Dublin in June 1914, and the Medical School the following term. He had captained his school at both cricket and hockey, and was a conspicuous forward in Trinity College team. Joining the University Officer Training Corps, he obtained his commission in the Royal Garrison Artillery on 10th November 1915, and after some months training at Spike Island, was transferred to Fort Campden, County Cork to which station he was afterwards appointed as O.C. He left for France on Christmas Day 1916, and served at the Somme, as Arras (where he was slightly wounded in the arm) and in Flanders, where he was mortally wounded on 3rd November 1917. In April last he had been recommended for distinction for special and conspicuous bravery on three occasions. A few weeks before his death he was offered the captaincy, but preferred to remain with his old battery.
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15/10/2017 Lieut Eric Wallace Harris From the Tyrone Courier dated 15th November 1917:
14/10/2017 2nd Lieut Newton Henry Collins Doctor James Collins stayed only a short time in Laghy.
14/10/2017 Pte. Henry Cobain The CWGC record Private Henry Cobain as the son of Joseph and Sarah Cobain. He is recorded as being born in County Tyrone.
14/10/2017 Pte. Henry Cobain Private Henry Cobain is buried in Peronne Road Cemetery, Maricourt, France.
14/10/2017 Pte. Henry Cobain The 6th East Kent’s were given the objective of taking the east edge of Trones Wood, east of the town of Albert. Captain L. P. Figgis and ten men were killed in the action that day, including Henry Cobain.
14/10/2017 Pte. Henry Cobain Private Henry Cobain was serving with the 6th Battalion of the East Kent Regiment when he was killed in action on the 27th August 1918.
14/10/2017 Pte. Henry Cobain During World War 1, the village of Maricourt was close to the front lines, at a point of junction between British and French Forces. The village fell into German hands during the great advance of March 1918 but was recaptured at the end of August.
14/10/2017 Pte. Henry Cobain At the Battle of Albert, (first phase, second Battles of the Somme1918), 37 Brigade, including the 6th East Kents took up the attack on the 9th August 1918 and by the next day they had advanced almost two miles. After a brief rest, the Division attacked again on 22nd August, pushing right across the wilderness of the old Somme Battlefields, capturing Meault, Mametz, Carnoy, Hardecourt and Faviere Wood, which it reached after a week’s, continuous fighting. The Division had made another advance of 15,000 yards.
14/10/2017 Pte. Henry Cobain In World War 1, the 6th Battalion East Kent Regiment (the Buffs) seen service and action at Loos, Somme, Albert, Pozieres, Le Transloy, Ancre, Arras, Cambrai, St. Quentin, Amiens, The Hindenburg Line 1918, Epehey and St. Quentin Canal
14/10/2017 Pte. Henry Cobain The East Kent Regiment, known as The Buffs, obtained the name when they were the 3rd Regiment of Foot in 1743 while on campaign in Holland and the Low Countries. The name refers to the ‘buff coats’- armour made of soft leather that the regiment was issued with. Regiments at that time were often called after the Colonel’s commanding them and as 3rd Regiment and 19th Regiment of Foot were both commanded by Thomas Howard and Charles Howard respectively, the regiments became known as Howard’s Regiment of Foot. To avoid any confusion the Regiments took the colours of their facings as part of their names, so the 19th Regiment of Foot became known as the ‘Green Howards’ and the 3rd Regiment became known as Howard’s Buffs, this was eventually shortened to The Buffs.
14/10/2017 Pte. Henry Cobain He subsequently transferred to the 6th Battalion East Kent Regiment, the Buffs.
14/10/2017 Pte. Henry Cobain Henry Cobain was working in the north of England when he enlisted at Chopwell, County Durham, joining the 9th Battalion of the Durham Light Infantry. (No 3114)
14/10/2017 Pte. Henry Cobain The 1901 census lists Henry as age 13 living with the family at house 9 in Gortindarragh, Pomeroy, County Tyrone. Henry was still at school his father was a builder.
14/10/2017 Pte. Henry Cobain Known family: Joseph Cobain, Sarah Cobain, Eliza Cobain (born about 1871), Thomas Cobain (born about 1878), Joseph Cobain (born about 1883), Henry Cobain (born about 1888).
14/10/2017 Pte. Henry Cobain Henry (Harry) Cobain was the son of Joseph and Sarah Cobain. Henry Cobain was born about 1889 in Tyrone, probably in the Pomeroy area.
14/10/2017 Pte. Patrick Carson He subsequently joined the Royal Dublin Fusiliers.
14/10/2017 Pte. Patrick Carson Patrick also served for a time with the Connaught Rangers, No. 3496.
14/10/2017 Pte. Peter Biggar The CWGC record Private Peter Biggar as the son of Patrick and Elizabeth Biggar of Stewartstown, County Tyrone.
14/10/2017 Pte. Peter Biggar Newspaper reports confirm he had lived in Stewartstown, although he is not listed on Stewartstown War Memorial.
14/10/2017 Pte. Peter Biggar Private Peter Biggar is buried in Vermelles Communal Cemetery in France.
14/10/2017 Pte. Peter Biggar Three men from that battalion were listed as killed in action on 12th June 1916 - Peter Biggar, Matthew Laurence and Ernest Corbett.
14/10/2017 Pte. Peter Biggar Private Peter Biggar was serving with the 13th Battalion of the Royal Scots when he was killed on 12th June 1916. Newspapers reported that he died as a result of an accident. He was 19 years old.
14/10/2017 Pte. Peter Biggar Peter was living in Edinburgh when he enlisted in with the Royal Scots in Leith.
14/10/2017 Pte. Peter Biggar Peter was the son of Patrick and Elizabeth Biggar.
14/10/2017 Pte. Peter Biggar Peter Biggar was born in Addiewell, Midlothian, Scotland about 1897.
13/10/2017 Lieut Eric Wallace Harris Captain F P Harris, M.C., Royal Army Medical Corps, attached R.F.A., son of Mr and Mrs Porter Harris, Curglasson, Stewartstown, has been awarded the Military Cross ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty under very heavy shell fire, attending to wounded and having them safely removed to cover.’ He was previously mentioned in despatches for gallant and distinguished services. This young officer has seen very heavy fighting. He served through the Gallipoli campaign from the first landing on 2th April 1915 at Cape Helles, until the final evacuation. He afterwards served in Egypt, and has been serving in France and Flanders since March 1916. He was gassed and wounded in May, and he was severely wounded on 16th August last, having his left arm fractured with shrapnel, and his left foot and right thigh also injured. He was admitted to St John’s Hospital, Etaples, and shortly afterwards removed to Newcastle-on-Tyne, where we are glad to say he is progressing most satisfactorily. Captain Harris was educated at Coleraine Academical Institution and at Trinity College, Dublin.
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13/10/2017 Lieut Eric Wallace Harris From the Tyrone Courier dated 20th September 1917: Stewartstown Officer Wins the M.C. (Captain F P Harris - cousin of Eric Wallace Harris)
13/10/2017 Lieut Eric Wallace Harris Eric was educated at Avoca School, Blackrock. He had captained his school at both cricket and hockey.
11/10/2017 Pte. Joseph Newell This week’s official casualty lists include the names of 4244 Private J McIntyre (Royal Scots Fusiliers), Dungannon, killed; and Privates S Newell, Stewartstown, (Royal Irish Rifles), and P Cassidy, Dungannon, (Northumberland Fusiliers), wounded.
11/10/2017 Pte. Joseph Newell 01269
11/10/2017 Pte. Joseph Newell From the Tyrone Courier dated 24th May 1917: Official Casualties (Private Samuel Newell – brother of Private Joseph Newell)
09/10/2017 Lieut Thomas James Kennedy Lieutenant Kennedy later transferred to the 16th Irish Division.
09/10/2017 Lieut Thomas James Kennedy Thomas J Kennedy had been in service with the South Irish Horse and volunteered on the outbreak of war and was given a Commission in the 36th Ulster Division.
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