Friends of the Somme - Mid Ulster Branch  
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Date Information
25/03/2018 James Greer McKay was the son of William and Annie McKay. William McKay and Annie Smart were married on 8th October 1874 in the district of Cookstown.
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25/03/2018 From the Bendigo Independent, dated 22nd December 1916: Lieutenant J G McKay
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25/03/2018 Lieutenant James Greer McKay was serving with the Australian Machine Gun Corps when he was killed in action on 19th August 1916 close to Mouquet Farm, know as Mucky Farm to allied troops.
25/03/2018 James Greer McKay was born in Cookstown, County Tyrone on 7th July 1885.
25/03/2018 His father and maternal grandfather, Samuel Smart, were in business in the town for many years.
25/03/2018 Private McKay left Australia with the 4th Light Horse Regiment on HMAT Wiltshire (A.18) on 19th October 1914.
25/03/2018 James was promoted to Lieutenant on 2nd July 1916
25/03/2018 He then went with his brigade to France and came unharmed through the Battle of the Somme.
25/03/2018 On Sunday, November 17, at the Drummartin Methodist Church, an ‘In Memorial’ service to the late Lieutenant James Greer McKay was conducted by the Rev. T. B. Lancaster. The pulpit was suitably draped with the Union Jack and Australian flag. A large congregation assembled to honour the memory of the brave soldier, who during his short residence in the district, had endeared himself to all with whom he came in contact by his agreeable manner and cheery disposition. The preacher, in opening his address, said that he wished to take the opportunity of giving a summary of the life of a departed friend, and by a life so unselfish, so noble, given up in the cause of righteousness and Christianity when it held in store for him many hopes, to draw some lessons that would urge others to follow his example not only on the "field of honour," but, in the performance of the daily round and common task. His watchword was ever "Duty First'. When war was declared he first thought of returning England and re-joining his own regiment. When Australia offered assistance to the Motherland he, after careful consideration of the matter, decided to offer his services to the Commonwealth. His previous military training and fine physique enabled him to join the First Expeditionary Force, and he sailed for Egypt in October. He took part in the memorable landing at Anzac and fought valiantly right through that campaign, and won his commission for his conduct and gallantry on the battlefield. He went with his brigade to France and shared with other Anzac heroes the privilege of taking his turn in the "first line" of trenches facing the enemy. He came unharmed through the terrible Battle of the Somme, and later on the Battle of Pozieres, and wrote praising the heroism of the men he led into action in these important engagements, concluding with the statement that none of them wished to be out of it until Britain stood victorious over her enemy. Although an Irishman by birth he spent most of his life at Leeds in England. He came to Australia, and the open free life of the farmer appealing to him, he made up his mind to gain experience and then settle on a farm. He cheerfully answered Australia's calls to arms to defend her liberty, and his name is written on Australia's scroll of honour, the pages of which will never dim while descendants of the noble Anzacs people our sunny land. In conclusion the Rev. gentleman extended to the relatives in England and here heartfelt sympathy in the loss of the dear one, and also referred to the later bereavement sustained by the death of Corporal Alan McKay, son of Mr and Mrs N. B. McKay, and nephew of Miss Essie McKay. At the conclusion of the service The Dead March in Saul" was effectively rendered by Miss Nessie Nicholls, the congregation standing while the last tribute of honour was paid to the dead.
25/03/2018 Private McKay landed at Gallipoli and served throughout. After Gallipoli he received his commission for services in the field.
25/03/2018 The family were prominently connected with First Presbyterian Church, Cookstown.
25/03/2018 At the outbreak of the First World War he enlisted at Broadmeadows as a private on 27th August 1914. His attestation papers show that he was 6 feet tall.
25/03/2018 When war was declared he first thought of returning to England and re-joining his own regiment. When Australia joined the war, James joined the Australians.
25/03/2018 He came to Australia, and the open free life of the farmer appealing to him, he made up his mind to gain experience and then settle on a farm.
25/03/2018 He served with the territorial regiment, Yorkshire Hussars before he emigrated to Australia in 1909.
25/03/2018 James was also actively associated with Cavendish Road Presbyterian Church, and was a member of the choir.
25/03/2018 James was educated at Belle Vue Road School and Leeds Central High School.
25/03/2018 The family left Cookstown for Leeds. They lived at Consort Terrace, Leeds and later of 8 St John’s Terrace, Belle Vue Road, Leeds.
25/03/2018 Known family: William McKay, Annie McKay, Eleanor McKay (born 20th September 1875), Hugh Malcolm Gracey McKay (born 17th August 1877), Caroline McKay (born 20th June 1879), Herbert McKay (born 28th May 1881), William E McKay (born 13th June 1883), James Greer McKay (born 7th July 1885), Margaret McKay (born 26th June 1887), Ann McKay (born 8th September 1889), Ernest Laurence McKay (born July 1891, Leeds).
25/03/2018 After leaving Gallipoli he was sent to France, where he was attached to the 1st Battalion of the Australian Machine Gun Corps.
30/12/2015 He is buried in plot 20, row B, grave 16 at Serre Road Cemetery No: 2, France. It is one of the largest cemeteries on the Somme.
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30/12/2015 ‘Lieutenant McKay was one of the finest characters it has been my fortune to come across, and a more gallant officer never lived. He volunteered to relieve another lieutenant for six hours as he told me they had had a very bad time and considered they should be relieved.’
30/12/2015 Amongst the Yorkshire casualties recently reported appears the name of a Leeds Australian, Lieutenant James Greer McKay, the fourth son of the late Mr W C McKay of Consort Terrace, and of Mrs McKay, St John’s Terrace, Belle Vue Road, Leeds, who was killed in France on 19th August. Lieutenant McKay, who is a nephew of Mr Foster McKay, Petty Sessions Clerk, Aughnacloy, was born in Cookstown, his father having been in business there before going to Leeds. His grandfather, Mr Samuel Smart, who also lives in Leeds and is over 80 years of age, was equally well known in business in Cookstown, and was warmly welcomed by old friends on the occasion of a visit to Cookstown some years ago. Lieutenant McKay’s father and grandfather were prominently connected with the First Presbyterian Church, Cookstown, and were successively superintendents of the Evening Sabbath School of that Church for about half a century. When the war broke out Lieutenant McKay was in Australia, having gone there about five years ago when he had for fellow passengers on the ship Rev Thomas Glass and Mrs Glass then of the First Presbyterian Church, Cookstown, and now resident in Melbourne when on their first visit down under. He at once joined the Australian contingent and fought at Gallipoli where he received his commission for services on the field. He then became attached to the Australian Machine Gun company. Prior to going to Australia, Lieutenant McKay was actively associated with Cavendish Road Presbyterian Church, Leeds, and was a member of the choir. He was educated at the Belle Vue Road School and the Leeds Central High School. Mrs McKay has two other sons serving with the colours. Captain W R French, in a letter to Mrs McKay says:-
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30/12/2015 From the Mid Ulster Mail dated Saturday 9th September 1916: Lieutenant James Greer McKay
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