Friends of the Somme - Mid Ulster Branch  
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3525   Private John Jordan
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Dated added: 30/12/2015   Last updated: 23/08/2018
Personal Details
Regiment/Service: 2nd Battalion, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (British Army)
Date Of Birth: 03/03/1893
Died: 14/05/1915 (Killed in Action)
Age: 22
Summary      
John Jordan was the son of John and Mary Ann Jordan. John was born in Desertlyn, Moneymore, Co Derry about 1893. The 1901 census shows the family in Tullyweery (Red Row), Coagh, Tyrone. John’s father was a ploughman, By 1911, the family had moved to Coltrim, Moneymore. John worked as a farm servant. John arrived in France in Sept 1914. Private John Jordan would have taken part in the Battle of Le Cateau, Battle of the Marne, Battle of Ainse and Battle of Armetires. Private John Jordan was killed by enemy shell fire on 14th May 1915.
Private John Jordan
Further Information
John Jordan was the son of John and Mary Ann Jordan (nee Robinson). They were married about 1884. John was born in Desertlyn, Moneymore, Co Derry on 3rd March 1893.
The 1901 census shows John as 8 years old. He was living with the family in Tullyweery (Red Row), Coagh, Tyrone. John’s father was a ploughman,
By 1911, the family had moved to Coltrim, Moneymore, Londonderry. John is living with the family. His age is given in the census as 21, which seems incorrect. He worked as a farm servant.
Family: John Jordan, Mary Ann Jordan, Elizabeth Jordan (born 2nd March 1887), David Jordan (born about 1889), Margaret Jordan (born 14th April 1891), John Jordan (born 3rd March 1893), Duncan Jordan (born about 1894), James Jordan (born 15th June 1895), Mary Jordan (born 21st December 1897), William Jordan (born 14th January 1900), Ruth Jordan (born 1st July 1904).
John Jordan took an active part in the work of the Ulster Volunteer Force.
1914
John Jordan enlisted in Cookstown. John had been a Reservist when he was called up.
John’s Medal card indicates that he arrived in France on 14th September 1914, missing the Battle of Mons.
John Jordan photo
Private John Jordan would have taken part in the Battle of Le Cateau, Battle of the Marne, Battle of Ainse and Battle of Armetires.
Another brother was serving in the same Battalion and they had left for France at the same time.
1915
From the Belfast Newsletter dated 30th January 1915:
Information has been received that Privates David and John Jordan, of the 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, are in hospital suffering from frostbitten limbs.
From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 6th February 1915:
Information has been received at Moneymore that Privates David and John Jordan, 2nd Battalion Inniskilling Fusiliers, are at present in hospital in England with frostbitten limbs. The brothers Jordan have been at the front since the Battle at Mons
On the 12th May 1915 the 2nd Battalion marched through Richebourg to take the line in preparation for the Battle of Festubert. It wasn’t so much trenches that they were holding as a series of frontline breastworks which had been erected and was the only possible means of shelter in the water logged country. These give little or no protection from enemy artillery fire and up until 15th May there had been 6 men from the Battalion killed and 40 wounded.
Private John Jordan was killed by enemy shell fire on 14th May 1915. He was 22 years old.
At the time of John Jordan’s death he had two other brothers training at Shane’s Park Camp at Randalstown with the 36th Ulster Division.
From the Belfast Newsletter dated 26th May 1915:
The relatives of Private John Jordan, Moneymore, of the 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, have received intimation that he was killed in action on the 14th May. Private Jordan, who was a reservist, took an active part in the work of the Ulster Volunteer Force before being called up. One of his brothers is in his battalion, while two others are in training at Randalstown.
From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 29th May 1915: Private John Jordan
Private John Jordan, Moneymore, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, killed in action on 14th May. Private Jordan was a reservist, and was called up at the mobilisation and left for France on 23rd August 1914 and had been through several engagements, including the Battle of Mons. Much sympathy is felt for his mother and sisters in their sad bereavement. Another brother is in the same battalion and left for the front at the same time as the deceased, while two other brothers are in training at Shane’s Park camp, Randalstown. The late Private Jordan took a great interest in the U.V.F. before he was called up for active service.
John Jordan grave
Private John Jordan is interred in plot 2, row D, grave 34 at Rue-des-Berceaux Cemetery close to Richebourg.
Of the three men killed with him or who subsequently died from wounds, two lie in Rue-de-Berceaux and are: E. Manning buried in plot 2, row D, grave 21 and P. McGuigan, buried in plot 2, row D, grave 32. The other man, Sergeant Francis McGartland, was seriously wounded and taken to Boulogne and died there of his wounds. He lies in Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, plot 8- row C- grave 42.
WILL: In the event of my death, I give all to my brother Duncan Jordan, Moneymore, Coltrim, Co Derry 3525 Private John Jordan 9 April 1915.
John Jordan: Form filled Will
John Jordan: Will Information
From the Belfast Newsletter dated 11th October 1915: David Jordan (brother of John Jordan)
Private David Jordan, 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, has arrived at his home at Moneymore, after having been at the Front for about 13 months. A reservist, Private Jordan was called up at the outbreak of the war. He has seen some very tough fighting, and has had the good fortune to escape without a scratch. His brother, Private John Jordan, also of the Inniskillings, was killed some time ago by the bursting of a shell. Before the outbreak of hostilities both brothers were prominent members of the Ulster Volunteer Force. Two other brothers are serving with the colours.
1916
From the Mid Ulster Mail dated Saturday 15th April 1916: Duncan Jordan (brother of John Jordan)
Newspaper Report
Intimation has been received by his relations in Moneymore that Private Duncan Jordan, 10th Battalion Inniskillings, has been wounded by shrapnel in the thigh. His brother John, who was a reservist, was killed in action last year, and another brother, David, who was also a reservist, has been serving since the beginning of the war., but has had the good fortune to escape without a scratch for so far. Another brother, who is a very young lad, is in the Ulster Division.
From the Mid Ulster Mail dated Saturday 13th May 1916:
Newspaper Report
JORDAN – In sad and loving memory of my dear brother, No 3525 Private John Jordan, 2nd Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, killed in action on May 14th 1915, aged 24 years.
‘Though one long year is past and gone since this great sorrow fell,
Yet in my heart I mourn the loss of one I loved so well.
In a far and distant land, where the trees and branches wave,
Lies a dear and loving brother, one I loved, but could not save.’
Silently mourned by his loving sister, Maggie Montgomery, Coltrim, Moneymore
From the Mid Ulster Mail dated Saturday 20th May 1916:
Newspaper Report
JORDAN – In loving memory of John Jordan, Moneymore, 2nd Battalion R.I.F., killed in action on 14th May 1915, aged 22 years.
‘Although we are in a far off land, and your grave we cannot see,
As long as life and memory last, we shall remember thee.
One year has gone, Oh, how we miss you; friends may think the wound has healed,
But Oh, they little know the sorrow deep within our hearts concealed.’
Deeply regretted by his sorrowing mother and his sisters Mary and Ruth; also by his two brothers on Active Service, and William in Finner Camp.
From the Mid Ulster Mail dated Saturday 8th July 1916: (Brother of Private John Jordan)
Newspaper Report
Duncan Jordan, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, has been wounded and is in hospital and was going on well. Private Jordan enlisted shortly after the outbreak of the war and proceeded to France with the Ulster Division. This is the second time he has been wounded. His brother John, who was a reservist, was killed in action last year, and another brother, David, who was also a reservist, has been at the front since shortly after the commenced and has had the good fortune to escape without a scratch for so far. A younger brother, William, is also in the Ulster Division and is stationed at Finner Camp. The three elder brothers were members of the Moneymore Company of the U.V.F.
From the Mid Ulster Mail dated Saturday 29 July 1916: (Brother of Private John Jordan)
Newspaper Report
Private Jordan is at present in hospital in Netley. As stated two weeks ago, one of his brothers was killed last year, and this is the second time he himself has been wounded.
From the Mid Ulster Mail dated Saturday 9th September 1916: (Brother of Private John Jordan)
Private Duncan Jordan, 10th Inniskillings, is at present home on furlough. He has been in hospital for a considerable time, having been severely wounded before the big offensive of 1st July commenced. He was also wounded earlier in the campaign.
From the Mid Ulster Mail dated Saturday 23rd December 1916: (Brother of Private John Jordan)
Corporal David Jordan, Royal Inniskillings, is home on leave. A reservist, he was called up on the outbreak of war , and was shortly afterwards sent to the front, where he has been ever since without receiving the slightest injury. A brother, also a reservist, was killed earlier in the war, and two other brothers are serving – one with the Ulster Division and the other with the Navy.
John Jordan is commemorated on Moneymore War Memorial (Assembly Rooms).
In 1966 veterans of the Battle of the Somme from Cookstown district attended a Review by Her Majesty the Queen at Balmoral. Pictured:
Front row from the left: Billy Jordan, Duncan Jordan, David Jordan, Thomas Watterson
Second row: Thomas Nelson, HHR Dolling, L. Bell, Bill Garret
Back row: J. McCord, Cookstown Branch standard bearer, and William Magee, No 4 Group standard bearer.
The CWGC records John as the son of Mrs. Mary Ann McAtee of Hammond Street, Moneymore. His mother had re-married after the death of her first husband.
Read more
Relevant Cookstown Area Locations
No Location Region Location Notes Longtitude Latitude
1 Tullyweery (Red Row), Coagh Cookstown East Census listing in Tullyweery (Red Row), Coagh 54.627578 -6.677543
2 Coltrim, Moneymore Moneymore Census listing in Coltrim, Moneymore 54.681213 -6.689108
References and Links
No Link Reference Map Doc
1 1901 Census lists Jordan family 1901 census lists Edward as age 8 living with the family at house 28 in Tullyweery (Red Row), Coagh
2 1911 Census lists Jordan family 1911 Census lists John as 21 living with the family at house 14 in Coltrim, Moneymore, Londonderry
3 FindAGrave.com Photo of Private John Jordan's grave
4 Mid Ulster Mail Somme veterans from Cookstown District in 1966 including photo
5 National Archives of Ireland Last Will and Testament of John Jordan
6 War Graves Photographic Project Photo of Private John Jordan's grave can be purchased here
Cookstown District's War Dead Acknowledgements 2010-2018