Friends of the Somme - Mid Ulster Branch  
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44264   Private David George Curran
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Dated added: 30/12/2015   Last updated: 15/02/2019
Personal Details
Regiment/Service: 1st Battalion, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (British Army)
Date Of Birth: 03/10/1899
Died: 23/10/1918 (Died of Wounds)
Age: 19
Summary      
David Curran was a son of David and Elizabeth Curran of Oldtown Street, Cookstown and was employed at Gunnings Factory. He enlisted in Cookstown late in 1916 and had been through many of the campaigns towards the end of the First World War. He was seriously wounded in both legs on 14th October 1918, and was taken to No 44 Casualty Clearing station where one of his legs was amputated. David was seriously ill and spent much of his time in the company of the Chaplain of the station where he spoke of his love for his Mother and the other members of the family at home. David died of his wounds on 23rd October 1918.
Further Information
David Curran was a son of David and Elizabeth Curran. David Curran married Elizabeth Maybin on 26th March 1894 in the district of Cookstown.
Both surnames have various spellings throughout the records.
David George Curran was born on 3rd October 1899. Military records suggest he was born in Derrylun, County Tyrone. No such place exists. It may be Derryloran.
The family were all born in the Cookstown area.
Family: David Curran, Lizzie Curran, Mary Elizabeth Curran (born 16th March 1895), Samuel James Curran (born 15th June 1897), David George Curran (born 3rd October 1899), John Maybin Curran (born 9th August 1902), Margaret Jane Curran (born 16th July 1906), Annie Curran (born 30th July 1909).
The 1911 census lists David George Curran as age 11 at house 11 in Oldtown Street, Cookstown. It shows that his mother was a widow.
David Curran was employed at Gunning’s Factory in Milburn, Cookstown.
David enlisted in Cookstown late in 1916.
David originally served as a private with the Royal Irish Rifles, Service No 20/333.
Private Curran had been through many of the campaigns towards the end of the First World War.
Private David Curran was serving with the 1st Battalion of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers when he was seriously wounded in both legs on 14th October 1918 in France.
Private Curran was taken to No 44 Casualty Clearing Station where one of his legs was amputated. Private Curran remained seriously ill and spent much of his time in the company of the chaplain of the station.
Private David Curran died of his wounds on Wednesday 23rd October 1918.
From the Belfast Newsletter dated 31st October 1918:
Private David Curran, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, son of Mrs Curran, Oldtown Street, Cookstown, died in France on 23rd October from wounds received in action.
From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 31st October 1918:
CURRAN - At No 44 Clearing Station on 23rd October, from wounds received in action on 14th, Private David Curran, Royal Inniskillings loved son of Mrs Curran, Oldtown Cookstown, aged 19 years.
** price of victory and peace,
** blood and life is paid –
** help the mother’s riven heart,
** son is lowly laid.
From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 31st October 1918: Private D Curran Killed
Mrs Curran, Oldtown, Cookstown, has received notification that her son, Private David Curran, Royal Inniskillings, died at No 44 Clearing Station on 23rd October, from wounds received in action on 14th. A previous message intimated that he had been severely wounded on both legs, one having to be amputated. An army chaplain writes giving particulars, and adding that he had seen the boy constantly while in the Clearing Station, and that he spoke much of his mother and family. The letter concludes:-
‘I know how sore your heart will be, and that your home will be desolate without him. But I hope you will try to remember that your loss is his gain, and it is well with your boy. Everything was done for him that was, humanly speaking, possible, but his wounds were so severe that he passed away on 23rd about 4 o’clock.’
Private Curran, who was only nineteen years of age, was held in great regard by all who knew him, and his death is generally regretted.
From the Tyrone Courier and Dungannon News dated Thursday 7 November 1918
Newspaper Report
Private David Curran, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, son of Mrs Curran, Oldtown Street, Cookstown, died in France on 23rd October 1918 from wounds received in action.
Last Will and Testament of Private David George Curran dated 11th June 1918:
In the event of my death, I give the whole of my property and effects to my mother Mrs Elizabeth Curran, 51 Oldtown Street, Cookstown, Co Tyrone. Rifleman 333, 4th Royal Irish Rifles.
Private David Curran is buried in Duhallow A.D.S Cemetery.
David George Curran's Grave
David’s elder brother, Private Samuel J Curran, was also killed in the war. He was killed in action two years earlier on 21st November 1916.
Private David Curran is commemorated on Cookstown Cenotaph, Gunning’s Factory Memorial (Royal British Legion Cookstown) and St. Luran’s Church of Ireland Roll of Honour Derryloran, Cookstown.
The CWGC record Private Curran as the son of David and Elizabeth Curran of Oldtown Street, Cookstown, Co. Tyrone.
Read more
Relevant Cookstown Area Locations
No Location Region Location Notes Longtitude Latitude
1 Oldtown Street Cookstown North Census listing in Oldtown St 54.650167 -6.745451
2 Gunnings Factory Cookstown North Worked at Gunnings Factory 54.649819 -6.752189
References and Links
No Link Reference Map Doc
1 1911 Census lists Curran family 1911 census lists David George as age 11 at house 11 in Oldtown Street, Cookstown
2 FindAGrave.com Photo of Private David George Curran's grave
3 National Archives of Ireland Last Will and Testament of Private David George Curran
4 National Archives UK Medal card can be purchased here
5 Private Samuel J Curran Brother of Private David G Curran
6 War Graves Photographic Project Photo of Private David George Curran's grave can be purchased here
Cookstown District's War Dead Acknowledgements 2010-2019